Dead bodies on the street, photographed from a car. The maker of the photograph cannot be revealed. Victims are mostly kidnapped and then murdered. Bodies are thrown on the street as warning or terror. Some militias prohibit family members to pick up the dead bodies. Sometimes it proves be a booby trap.

Harriet Logan

Exhibition: Unveiled: Voices of Women in Afghanistan

Harriet Logan was born in England in 1967.

Whilst studying Illustration at the Rhode Island School of Design, USA Harriet completed an intimate and moving photo-thesis documenting the life of "John" a young man dying of AIDS.

As a photojournalist she has worked on world-wide assignments for international newspapers and magazines including stories in Somalia, Sudan, the former Yugoslavia, Chechenya, Kosovo, Mongolia, Iran, China, Iraq, Kenya, Kashmir, Angola, Mozambique, India and America.

In 1992 Harriet received the Ian Parry Award from The Sunday Times and Nikon, which funded a six-month trip following the railway line from Benguela, Angola to Beira in Mozambique. This work was published in a book by Picador "Blood on the Tracks".

Harriet was a participant in the 1994 World Press Photo Masterclass in Amsterdam. In March 1996 she was one of four British photographers invited to exhibit in Zurich for the Night of Photography show.

Over several years, Harriet worked on a long-term project on prostitution for which she received the Observer Newspaper Hodge Award in 1996. A selection of this work was exhibited at the Photographers Gallery in London. Essays include: ‘Diana’ - life of a High Class Mayfair Madam; ‘Julie’ - a mother in Manchester working to support her Downs Syndrome child; and ‘Daily Planet’ - one of Melbourne’s legal brothels.

1998 Harriet was one of six Network photographers involved in a joint project commemorating the 50th anniversary of the NHS, where she documented accident and emergency wards.

She spent many weeks in the kitchen of the Ivy restaurant in London for their book written by AA Gil and went on to work on a kids food book called ‘Eat Up’ written by the Executive chef of the Ivy, Le Caprice and J Sheekey – Mark Hix

Her highly acclaimed essay “Women in Afghanistan”, shot on assignment for the Sunday Times Magazine in December 1997 was exhibited at Visa pour l’Image, the annual international festival of photojournalism in Perpignan and subsequently exhibited in Los Angeles, Brussels, Paris and Warsaw.

Harriet’s’ book “Unveiled” was published by Regan books, a subsidiary of Harper Collins, in April 2002. In it, she revisits Afghanistan to find the women she worked with in 1997, under the Taliban.

Harriet also received the special award for Magazine Photographer at the 1999 Picture Editor’s Awards and The Vic Odden Award from the Royal Photographic Society, 2000.

Over the past six years, Harriet has concentrated on working in advertising and has built a solid client base with most of the UKs leading agencies.

She is represented by Mark George.

Harriet lives in London with her two children, Jackson and Freddie.